Best of Instagram

first_imgMay 28, 2019 Share This!It’s been an exciting week with so many new sights, especially in Galaxy’s Edge. Get caught up here in the Best of Instagram.If you’re new to this series, we post highlights from our Instagram page, along with a top comment or photo featuring YOU, our subscriber.Enjoy!May 27, 2019 June 2, 2019 June 1, 2019 May 31, 2019center_img May 30, 2019 May 29, 2019 Top Follower of the Week!There’s been a ton of tears of joy this week, from everyone there and many of the people following along. Do you have plans to visit Galaxy’s Edge at Disneyland or when it comes to Walt Disney World? Let us know in the comments.Should this post inspire you to give our Instagram page a follow, I’ll leave the link right here: http://www.instagram.com/touringplans.last_img read more

Museum that bridges past, future

first_imgThe Red Location Museum of the People’s Struggle in New Brighton, Port Elizabeth – winner of three international awards – was designed to be both a monument to South Africa’s struggle against apartheid and an integral part of community life in a township that acted as a crucible for the struggle.The museum is located in the Red Location shack settlement, New Brighton’s oldest neighbourhood, scene of one of the first public acts of defiance against apartheid when, in 1952, black railway workers refused to show their “passes” to enter railway property.The striking, industrial warehouse-styled complex uses space, oxidised corrugated iron, wood and steel to echo its shanty town surrounds – the Red Location shacks for resettled blacks, orginally constructed out of material recycled from defunct Anglo-Boer War concentration camps.International awardsThe museum, which opened to the public in November 2006, has won three major international awards.In June 2006 it was awarded the Royal Institute of British Architects’ inaugural Lubetkin Prize for the most outstanding work of architecture outside the UK and Europe by a member of the institute – beating stiff competition from the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa and the Terrence Donnelly Centre in Toronto.The museum project also landed the city of Port Elizabeth the 2005 World Leadership Award for architecture and civil engineering, and the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality the 2005/06 Dedalo Minosse International Prize for Commissioning a Building.“To build a museum of the apartheid era in the midst of the township that acted as a crucible for the struggle is an extraordinary achievement,” the Lubetkin Prize judges said in a statement. “The Red Location Museum brilliantly rises to the challenge, using architectural skill of the highest order to produce an unforgettable experience that is both viscerally and intellectually moving.”Part of the surrounding communityThe museum complex, designed not only as a tourist attraction but also as an integral part of the surrounding community, includes an art gallery specialising in the work of Eastern Cape artists and will also house a market, a centre for creative arts, a library and adult literacy centre and a conference centre.Hundreds of new state-subsidised low-cost houses have been built in the surrounding area.The museum integrates into the existing neighborhood of former victims of apartheid as a seamless part of their daily life. “In this way, the horror of apartheid becomes more apparent simply by its calm presence in the museum side by side with a functioning community,” says architect Jo Noero of Cape Town-based Noero Wolff Architects, who designed the complex.‘Memory boxes’The museum’s design draws on notions of memory to show both the horrors of institutionalised racism and the heroic efforts of the anti-apartheid movement in sharp relief.“All museums concern memory and history; it was therefore all the more impressive to encounter one in which particular histories and memories have evoked an extraordinarily powerful architectural idea,” the Lubetkin judges said.The concept of “memory boxes” – in which migrant workers on South Africa’s mines carried artefacts to remind them of their homes in the countryside – forms the basis for a building which is in itself one huge memory box.Designed in industrial form to incorporate the rusted corrugated iron – the Red Location – theme of the surrounding settlement, the museum houses steel containers tipped on end to make individual memory boxes, giving its curators a blank canvas in which to exhibit memories, responses and ideas.The most powerful of these piles of boxes, according to the judges, contain police files on those who were murdered, judicially or otherwise, during the struggle against apartheid. Above the boxes hang three nooses.“The building works as both metaphor and object: deliberately unglamorous, this is an architectural tour de force.”In contrast to the memory boxes, visitors to the L-shaped museum first pass through a hall of columns, designed by artists to resemble totems, honouring those who gave their lives in the struggle against apartheid.Having seen how the apartheid government used architecture and planning as tools of racism and division, Noero hopes to use architecture to heal. The museum, he says, “seeks to build new memories – ones that will not let us forget apartheid’s atrocities, and those that will allow us to begin to hope for an African renaissance.”SouthAfrica.info reporterArticle last updated: March 2007 Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Top stories: CRISPR babies fallout, research funders’ tax havens, and our ancient shrinking sun

first_img(left to right): STEPHEN VOSS; STEPHAN SCHMITZ/FOLIO ART; S. WIESSINGER/SDO/NASA’S GODDARD SPACE FLIGHT CENTER By Frankie SchembriDec. 7, 2018 , 4:15 PM Top stories: CRISPR babies fallout, research funders’ tax havens, and our ancient shrinking suncenter_img An ‘epic scientific misadventure’: NIH head Francis Collins ponders fallout from CRISPR baby studyIn a statement condemning the work of Chinese scientist He Jiankui in using CRISPR to genetically modify human embryos, Francis Collins, head of the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, says the only way forward in germline gene editing trials is “strict independent oversight.” Collins says NIH embraces the role it may need to play in overseeing controversial gene-editing projects going forward.Private research funders court controversy with billions in secretive investmentsSign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)An investigation of public records and documents known as the Paradise Papers has found that leading research philanthropies—including the Wellcome Trust and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation—have invested more than $5 billion in offshore tax and secrecy havens. Some investments, such as those in highly polluting fuels, undermine the groups’ charitable goals. Critics say that when foundations lend their sterling reputations to offshore strategies, they help legitimize lawful but extreme tax avoidance, and provide cover for money laundering.Did our ancient sun go on a diet? Bands of martian rock could solve the ‘faint young sun’ paradoxScientists have long puzzled over something called the “faint young sun” paradox: Even though our sun used to put out far less energy—and heat—than it does today, there’s ample evidence of flowing water on early Earth and Mars. Now, a team of astronomers says the early sun was actually more massive than we thought—and that proof of its mass should be found in sedimentary rocks on Mars.Why are these Costa Rican monkeys turning yellow?When howler monkeys in Costa Rica started to develop yellow patches on their typically black tails and legs, scientists analyzed their fur to find the source of the strange transformation. The researchers found evidence that the animals’ pigmentation is being altered by increased sulfur from pesticides they ingest as they munch on the leaves of trees surrounding pineapple, banana, and African palm oil farms.Guns kill more U.S. kids than cancer. This emergency physician aims to prevent those firearm deathsWhen Rebecca Cunningham was 5 years old, her mother bought a gun and kicked out her violent husband, who had beaten and threatened to kill her. Now, Cunningham, a professor at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, is directing the largest gun research grant the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded in at least 30 years. With $4.9 million from NIH’s child health institute and a team of 27 researchers at 12 institutions, she is on a mission to jump-start gun injury research on a population as vulnerable as she once was: U.S. children and teenagers, for whom guns are the second-leading cause of death.last_img read more

George Clooney’s 54th birthday: 9 Lesser known facts about the Hollywood star

first_imgThere is more than meets the eye. It is certainly applicable to George Clooney. First, it is hard to believe that he turned 54 yesterday, he certainly doesn’t look 54. Second, while most people admire his handsome self, the “sexiest man alive” has played a part in many notable films – switching roles among actor, director, writer and producer. In every aspect, George Clooney has been like wine, getting better with age.Here are a few interesting facts about the Ocean’s trilogy star you probably didn’t know:1. He is the first individual to get an Academy Award nomination in six different categories, for Writing and Original Screenplay, Directing, Performance in a Lead Role, Performance in a Supporting Role, Writing and Adapted Screenplay and Producer. He won two of the six, for a supporting role in Syriana and Best Motion Picture for Argo2. Clooney swore to never marry again after his first five-year marriage with actress Talia Balsman broke out in 1993. Breaking the vow, he married lawyer and activist Amal Alamuddin in 20143. Clooney was bet 10,000 US Dollars by Michelle Pfeiffer and Nicole Kidman that he would have children by the age of 40 – he won. Although, he returned his winnings and bet double or nothing, raising the age to 504. Clooney was born in a very popular family. His mother, Nina Bruce, was a former beauty pageant queen and his father, Nick Clooney, was a former game show host and anchorman. Singers/actresses Rosemary Clooney and Betty Clooney were his aunts5. He was a very active sports player. He played basketball and baseball, and even tried out for baseball team Cincinnati Reds, although he couldn’t get a professional contract 6. Clooney once got in a fistfight with David. O Russell on the set of The Three Kings. It was a reaction of Russell yelling at extras out of frustrationadvertisement7. Besides being an iconic Hollywood figure, George Clooney has also done humanitarian work and been a political activist. He has been serving as the “United Nations Messengers for Peace” since 2008. He was even arrested once for civil disobedience during a protest at the Sudanese embassy in Washington8. He had a pet pig named Max for eighteen years9. He is a huge fan of South Park, and even requested a role in the series from the creator, Trey Parker. He played the role of the dog, Sparky.last_img read more

Joe Root puts family before Indian Premier League riches

first_imgEngland batsman Joe Root will not be available to play in the lucrative Indian Premier League (IPL) this year as he is eager to spend time at home with his newborn son, the 26-year-old has said. (Root and Kohli are the best right now, says Ian Botham)One of the most sought-after batsmen of his era, Root has been reportedly been contacted by several franchises of the cash-rich Twenty20 league beginning on April 5. (Root and Kohli after 50 Tests: Who has the better stats?)”It is a shame because there is a really good window in the international calendar to play. But looking at the schedule, especially next winter, I am going to be away for long periods,” Root told British media.”This will be a great opportunity to spend time at home and watch (son) Alfred grow up a little bit. A lot of great things would come from the IPL, a lot of great experiences and I am sure it would help to improve my game.”But at the moment being at home is my priority and I want to make sure I do not miss out on that. It is quite tough being away in these early days so it will be nice to catch up.”Root made 78 in England’s three-wicket loss in Sunday’s first one-dayer against India. Cuttack hosts the second and penultimate match of the series on Thursday.last_img read more

Jamaica Appoints Representative to African Union

first_imgThe Office of the Prime Minister announces the appointment of Mr. Carlton Masters as Jamaica’s first Representative to the African Union (AU). Mr. Masters has also been appointed as Special Envoy of the Prime Minister and assumes the rank of Ambassador. As Representative and Special Envoy, Ambassador Masters will seek to strengthen Jamaica’s relations and partnerships with a range of African countries and organisations and deepen our dialogue on issues of strategic importance. He will also be engaged in promoting dialogue and exploring greater opportunities for trade, investment and cooperation with partners in Africa. With over thirty-five years of experience in international trade and investment, Ambassador Masters will advance trade, cooperation and investment opportunities across a wide range of sectors in the interest of Jamaica’s growth and development. He brings considerable passion and a wide range of skills to this assignment. Ambassador Masters’ appointment took effect on February 4, 2013. He presented his credentials to the Chairperson of the African Union Commission Dr. Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma on March 21, 2013.last_img read more

Labour Min notifies 865 interest rate on EPF for 201819

first_imgNew Delhi: The Labour Ministry has notified 8.65 per cent interest rate on employees provident fund for 2018-19, which will now be credited to the accounts of more than 6 crore subscribers of retirement fund body EPFO, Union minister Santosh Gangwar said on Tuesday. The EPFO has been settling EPF withdrawal claims at 8.55 per cent interest rate, approved for 2017-18. Now, the EPFO will settle accounts at a higher rate of 8.65 per cent for 2018-19. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss account details under automatic exchange framework “It gives me immense pleasure that for fiscal 2018-19, Labour Ministry has notified 8.65 per cent rate of interest on employees’ provident fund (EPF). This rate of interest is 10 basis points higher than 8.55 per cent provided in 2017-18,” Gangwar said in a statement issues here. “This rate of interest (8.65 per cent) was approved by the EPFO’s apex decision making body Central Board of Trustees on February 22, 2019. We received concurrence of the Finance Ministry on September 19, 2019. Thereafter, Labour Ministry issued a notification for providing 8.65 per cent rate of interest for 2018-19,” the minister said. The minister also informed that this decision would pave the way for crediting Rs 54,000 crore as 8.65 per cent interest for 2018-19, into the accounts of more than 6 crore EPFO subscribers. PTI had reported on September 19, 2019, that the government had approved 8.65 per cent rate of interest on EPF for 2018-19 fiscal year.last_img read more