Marshfield girls soccer upends Ashwaubenon in WIAA Division 2 regional semifinal

first_imgBy Paul Lecker Sports ReporterASHWAUBENON – The Marshfield girls soccer team pulled off a big playoff win Thursday, upsetting No. 3 seed Ashwaubenon 2-1 in a WIAA Division 2 regional semifinal.The sixth-seeded Tigers, who had lost to Ashwaubenon 4-3 during the regular season, improve to 6-16-1 and will move on to a D-2 regional final at No. 2 seed Rhinelander (17-3-1) at 7 p.m. Saturday. The Hodags shut out Merrill 4-0 on Thursday.Marshfield lost to Rhinelander 5-2 at the Hodags’ home tournament on May 13.Julia Urban scored off an assist from Olivia Haessly just 2:26 into the game, and Kendra Tremelling added another goal at the 12:35 mark to give the Tigers an early 2-0 lead.Marshfield’s Andrea Carolfi had eight saves in goal, giving up just one to the Jaguars’ Sakora John 5:02 into the second half.“The defense played particularly great in shutting down Kayla Minor, who had a hat trick in their win against us earlier this season,” Marshfield coach Steve Lindner said. “The whole team had a great week, and even though the rotation was smaller for the players, it was a team victory.“Emily Critelli played outstanding, her greatest game as a Tiger. She saved two goals with kicks that were heading in the net to preserve the win.”(Hub City Times Sports Reporter Paul Lecker is also the publisher of MarshfieldAreaSports.com.)Tigers 2, Jaguars 1Marshfield 2 0 – 2Ashwaubenon 0 1 – 1First half: 1. M, Julia Urban (Olivia Haessly), 2:26; 2. M, Kendra Tremelling (O. Haessly), 12:35.Second half: 3. A, Sakora John, 50:02.Saves: M, Andrea Carolfi 8.Records: Marshfield 6-16-1; Ashwaubenon 9-9-6.last_img read more

Freedom ‘is our common heritage’

first_img25 September 2013Telling the country’s history in an all-encompassing way shows us that the freedom we now enjoy is not “the exclusive preserve of any one social grouping but a proud heritage of all South Africans,” Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe said on Tuesday.Motlanthe was addressing a Heritage Day rally at Sisa Dukashe Stadium in Mdantsane township outside East London.The Deputy President said that South Africans marked the national holiday “with the conscious understanding that there is a great deal about our history that is bad and hurtful, yet we must accept it as part of the growing pains of the free society we set out to create in 1994; a society that is united, democratic, non-racial, non-sexist and just.”Tuesday’s occasion also marked the 50th anniversary of the establishment of Mdantsane. Home to more than 500 000 South Africans, Mdantsane is one of the oldest townships in South Africa, and was a hotbed of political activism against apartheid.Earlier in the day, Motlanthe unveiled an upgraded memorial and laid a wreath at the site of the Egerton Massacre. In 1983, communities from East London and Mdantsane had embarked on a boycott to protest an unannounced five cent increase in bus fares.The boycott culminated on 4 August in what was later called the Egerton Massacre, which claimed 11 lives, with a further 36 commuters injured. The massacre took place at Egerton Railway Station outside Mdantsane, where police officials from the apartheid bantustan of Ciskei shot and beat residents.Motlanthe said that the struggle for South Africa’s liberation was waged by “the broadest cross-section of the people of our country and was not just about political freedom, but also about social, cultural, psychological and economic freedom”.Mdantsane, he said, had to be “supported with the necessary socio-economic infrastructure to realise its full reintegration into all avenues of South African life, and not continue as a reserve for the abode of the poor, the unemployed and the disenfranchised”.The Mdantsane heritage project, like all others in South Africa, should be “inclusive of the names, languages, places, people and cultures that were manipulated and falsified to bring about divisions,” Motlanthe said.“Unity of all South Africans is a guiding principle which should never be undermined by sectarian and parochial interests.”SAinfo reporter and SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

9 Photos From Day 1 of the ReadWriteWeb 2WAY Summit

first_imgRichard MacManus, ReadWriteWeb founder, and Mike McCue, Flipboard founder and CEOBaratunde Thurston, Director of Digital for The Onion 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Tags:#conferences#RWW 2WAY 2011#web abraham hyatt Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Chris Dixon, hunch founder, left, and Marshall Kirkpatrick, ReadWriteWeb co-editor. Chris Dixoncenter_img A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts danah boyd, researcher at Microsoft Research New EnglandFred Wilson, venture capitalistAndy Carvin, senior strategist, social media desk at NPR and Emily Bell, director of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia Universitylast_img read more

JC motorcycle rider badly hurt on Highway 179

first_imgA motorcycle rider is flown to the hospital after a wreck in Jefferson City.Police say a car making a left turn crashed into Anthony Adrian’s Harley going the other way on Highway 179 at Missouri Boulevard at about 3 p.m. Sunday.Adrian, 60, was ejected. Police say he is in critical condition.The car’s driver, 29-year-old Darrel Weakly, was not hurt.last_img

Can these birds explain how language first evolved?

first_imgThe wild munia (left) tends to be less social than the Bengalese finch (right) and its song is simpler. Left to right: FLPA/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO; STUART HOUGH/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO Bengalese finch song K. Okanoya If you want a no-fuss, no-muss pet, consider the Bengalese finch. Dubbed the society finch for its friendliness, breeders often use it to foster unrelated chicks. But put the piebald songbird next to its wild ancestor, the white-rumped munia, and you can both see and hear the differences: The aggressive munia tends to be darker and whistles a scratchy, off-kilter tune, whereas the pet finch warbles a melody so complex that even nonmusicians may wonder how this caged bird learned to sing.All this makes the domesticated and wild birds a perfect natural experiment to help explore an upstart proposal about human evolution: that the building blocks of language are a byproduct of brain alterations that arose when natural selection favored cooperation among early humans. According to this hypothesis, skills such as learning complex calls, combining vocalizations, and simply knowing when another creature wants to communicate all came about as a consequence of pro-social traits like kindness. If so, domesticated animals, which are bred to be good-natured, might exhibit such communication skills too.The idea is rooted in a much older one: that humans tamed themselves. This self-domestication hypothesis, which got its start with Charles Darwin, says that when early humans started to prefer cooperative friends and mates to aggressive ones, they essentially domesticated themselves. Along with tameness came evolutionary changes seen in other domesticated mammals—smoother brows, shorter faces, and more feminized features—thanks in part to lower levels of circulating androgens (such as testosterone) that tend to promote aggression.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Higher levels of neurohormones such as serotonin were also part of the domestication package. Such pro-social hormones help us infer others’ mental states, learn through joint attention, and even link objects and labels—all prerequisites for language, says developmental psychologist Michael Tomasello of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, who studies social cognition.In recent papers and at Evolang, a biannual conference on language evolution held here this spring, researchers turned to birds, foxes, and bonobos to help understand how domestication may have paved the way for language. Constantina Theofanopoulou, a neuroscientist at the University of Barcelona in Spain who convened the Evolang workshop, calls it the “most promising” working hypothesis to account for the thorny problem of language evolution, because it “puts together evidence from different levels of biological analysis: the anatomical, the brain, the endocrine system, and behavior.”In his talk at Evolang, ornithologist Kazuo Okanoya of the Riken Center for Brain Science in Wako, Japan, focused on the munia and the Bengalese finch, which people domesticated some 250 years ago. Both birds are vocal learners, a rare trait that lets them pick up calls from adult tutors—as do parrots, hummingbirds, and humans. But their songs are wildly different, as Okanoya demonstrated by whistling examples of each.He then presented data quantifying what the audience had heard: Munia songs tend to be shorter, simpler, and full of unmelodic segments of acoustic “noise,” compared with the longer, louder finch songs, which contain peeps, chirps, and segments that often repeat and recombine in improvisational ways. 00:0000:0000:00 By Michael Erard , Catherine MatacicAug. 2, 2018 , 11:30 AMcenter_img K. Okanoya 00:0000:0000:00 Munia song Okanoya says the differences likely arose from domestication, in particular the finches’ relatively stress-free environment. He’s shown that the finches have lower fecal levels of corticosterone—a hormone that boosts aggressiveness and blunts cognitive functioning in birds—than the munia. In his talk, Okanoya reported that high corticosterone levels inhibit the growth of neurons in the birds’ song-learning system, which is larger in the finches than in the munia.Thus, Okanoya hypothesizes, selection for tameness and gregariousness by pet owners boosted the finches’ capacity for complex song. And because attention-getting songs help advertise fitness to females, the males best at learning and singing would be most likely to pass their genes on to the next generation, sparking further complexity.If early humans somehow developed their own lower-stress “domesticated” environment—perhaps as a result of easier access to food—it could have fostered more cooperation and reduced aggression, speculates evolutionary linguist Simon Kirby, writing with James Thomas, both of The University of Edinburgh, in a recent paper in Biology & Philosophy. As with the finch, a mellow environment may have allowed for an expanded role for learning, including in language acquisition.Kirby and Thomas point out another analog for humans: domesticated foxes. In a famous experiment, Russian geneticist Dmitry Belyaev and colleagues selected for tameness among captured Siberian silver foxes starting in the 1950s. If a wild fox did not attack a human hand placed into its cage, it was bred. Over 50 generations, the foxes came to look like other domesticated species, with shorter faces, curly tails, and lighter coloring—traits that have since been linked to shifts in prenatal hormones.Unlike their wild counterparts, tame foxes came to understand the importance of human pointing and gazing, Thomas and Kirby note. That ability to “mind read” is key to language. Thus, even though the foxes don’t vocalize in complex ways, they show that selection only for tameness can carry communication skills in its wake.At Evolang, other researchers zeroed in on bonobos, great apes that show some signs of self-domestication, including low levels of aggression and sensitivity to the gaze of others. According to Zanna Clay, a primatologist at Durham University in the United Kingdom, bonobos also display a building block of early language: Instead of sticking to a fixed repertoire of “inherited” calls, they can improvise.Clay and her colleagues have assembled hundreds of recordings from 18 bonobos in the wild and in zoos, showing that individuals combine set types of calls in distinct ways for different situations. She hypothesizes that self-domestication may have helped shape this communicative flexibility.Stronger proof may come from genetic studies. Theofanopoulou and her team recently scoured the scientific literature for genes that differ between wild and domesticated species—cats, dogs, horses, and cattle—and that also show signs of being selected in the domesticated animals. The team did the same for modern humans and what they considered our nearest wild stand-ins, Neanderthals and Denisovans.Then, the researchers looked for genes that may have evolved in the same way in more than one wild-domesticated pair. There were more than three dozen, many linked to brain plasticity, learning, and the development of the nervous system, the team reported late last year in PLOS ONE. Some, such as the gene for a receptor for the neurotransmitter glutamate, are linked to processes that could shape a language-ready brain. But there’s no clear path yet from these genes to their function—or to the sweeping changes linked to domestication, cautions Antonio Benítez-Burraco, a linguist at the University of Seville in Spain.Tomasello also cautions against trying to explain human language solely from animal models. “I think humans were selected to actually collaborate,” not just to get rid of aggression, he says. “[That] fundamentally cooperative motive … is a precursor to uniquely human communication.” Can these birds explain how language first evolved?last_img read more

Top stories: CRISPR babies fallout, research funders’ tax havens, and our ancient shrinking sun

first_img(left to right): STEPHEN VOSS; STEPHAN SCHMITZ/FOLIO ART; S. WIESSINGER/SDO/NASA’S GODDARD SPACE FLIGHT CENTER By Frankie SchembriDec. 7, 2018 , 4:15 PM Top stories: CRISPR babies fallout, research funders’ tax havens, and our ancient shrinking suncenter_img An ‘epic scientific misadventure’: NIH head Francis Collins ponders fallout from CRISPR baby studyIn a statement condemning the work of Chinese scientist He Jiankui in using CRISPR to genetically modify human embryos, Francis Collins, head of the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, says the only way forward in germline gene editing trials is “strict independent oversight.” Collins says NIH embraces the role it may need to play in overseeing controversial gene-editing projects going forward.Private research funders court controversy with billions in secretive investmentsSign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)An investigation of public records and documents known as the Paradise Papers has found that leading research philanthropies—including the Wellcome Trust and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation—have invested more than $5 billion in offshore tax and secrecy havens. Some investments, such as those in highly polluting fuels, undermine the groups’ charitable goals. Critics say that when foundations lend their sterling reputations to offshore strategies, they help legitimize lawful but extreme tax avoidance, and provide cover for money laundering.Did our ancient sun go on a diet? Bands of martian rock could solve the ‘faint young sun’ paradoxScientists have long puzzled over something called the “faint young sun” paradox: Even though our sun used to put out far less energy—and heat—than it does today, there’s ample evidence of flowing water on early Earth and Mars. Now, a team of astronomers says the early sun was actually more massive than we thought—and that proof of its mass should be found in sedimentary rocks on Mars.Why are these Costa Rican monkeys turning yellow?When howler monkeys in Costa Rica started to develop yellow patches on their typically black tails and legs, scientists analyzed their fur to find the source of the strange transformation. The researchers found evidence that the animals’ pigmentation is being altered by increased sulfur from pesticides they ingest as they munch on the leaves of trees surrounding pineapple, banana, and African palm oil farms.Guns kill more U.S. kids than cancer. This emergency physician aims to prevent those firearm deathsWhen Rebecca Cunningham was 5 years old, her mother bought a gun and kicked out her violent husband, who had beaten and threatened to kill her. Now, Cunningham, a professor at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, is directing the largest gun research grant the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded in at least 30 years. With $4.9 million from NIH’s child health institute and a team of 27 researchers at 12 institutions, she is on a mission to jump-start gun injury research on a population as vulnerable as she once was: U.S. children and teenagers, for whom guns are the second-leading cause of death.last_img read more