LGE completes Pomo at Gilbert’s Heritage Marketplace

first_imgLGE Design Build has completed tenant improvement construction for the 2,600-square-foot Pomo Pizzeria Napoletana at Heritage Marketplace in Gilbert.The restaurant features a 6,000-pound, wood-fire pizza oven imported from Italy with hand-crafted stone. In addition, the authentic Italian restaurant features a bar and outdoor seating.“As one of the restaurant hotspots in the Valley, Heritage Marketplace attracts a young crowd and creates a vibrant atmosphere. It is the perfect location for our fourth Valley restaurant. We’ve been busy since day one with happy guests,” said Stefano Fabbri, CEO and a partner of Pomo Restaurant Group.The Pomo Restaurant Group also owns Pomo restaurants in Glendale, Scottsdale and Phoenix. Pomo at Heritage Marketplace opened in July.Heritage Marketplace, also developed by LGE Design Build, is a family friendly, pedestrian-oriented, mixed-use development in downtown Gilbert located on the northwest corner of Gilbert Road and Vaughn Avenue. The development is an integral part of Gilbert’s historic Heritage District.LGE Design Build launched Heritage Marketplace’s Phase 2 in June. The phase includes two buildings totaling 32,000 square feet with ground floor restaurant and retail space, and second floor office space. The north building is about 10,000 square feet and the south building is about 22,000 square feet.In Phase 1, LGE has completed 31,000 square feet of a dynamic mixed-use office/retail/restaurant project. Tenants include Lo-Lo’s Chicken & Waffles, Pomo Pizzeria, Barrio Queen, Zinburger and Petersen’s Old-Fashioned Ice Cream.“Heritage Marketplace is bustling with restaurant and business activity, becoming one of the Valley’s premier destinations for dining and commerce,” said Dave Sellers, LGE Design Build president.last_img read more

News report says multiple Saudi hospitals treating nCoV cases

first_imgMay 7, 2013 (CIDRAP News) – A media report late yesterday suggested that the 13 novel coronavirus (nCoV) cases reported in Saudi Arabia in the past few days are not confined to just one hospital, contrary to a May 5 statement from the Saudi health ministry.Malek al Moosa, executive director of a small hospital in Hofuf, in the country’s Eastern province, said the hospital has treated many of the nCoV patients but that it was not the only hospital treating such patients, the Wall Street Journal reported.Also, a man who is a cousin of three patients in the current case cluster, including one who died, said his cousins went to three different hospitals in the province, the newspaper said. The story did not name the man.The 13 cases, with 7 deaths, have all been reported since May 2. On May 5, Ziad A. Memish, MD, deputy minister for public health, reported that transmission of the disease seemed linked to one healthcare facility. He said there had been no transmission in the community.But Moosa denied that his hospital was the center of the outbreak, according to the Journal. “We have maybe paid the price of being transparent,” by testing patients and reporting the results, he said.The unidentified man whose cousins were infected told the newspaper that the Saudi health ministry “just wants to close the books” by saying the recent cases are limited to one hospital.Reports of the hospital cluster have stirred concern about possible person-to-person transmission of the virus and have prompted experts to recall how hospital outbreaks spurred the spread of SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome), another coronavirus infection, a decade ago.The novel virus is believed to be spreading to humans from some unidentified animal source. But person-to-person transmission has been clearly shown once before, when two family members of an infected UK man caught the virus from him after he returned sick from a trip to Saudi Arabia and Pakistan. Other small case clusters also have occurred, but human transmission has not been proved in those.In other developments, the Saudi government has invited an international team of experts to help investigate the outbreak, the Journal story said. The team is expected to arrive this week.Also, the World Health Organization (WHO) released guidance yesterday on infection prevention and control in caring for confirmed or probable nCoV case-patients.The 9-page document recommends assigning probable or confirmed cases “to be cared for exclusively by a group of skilled [healthcare workers] both for continuity of care and to reduce opportunities for inadvertent infection control breaches that could result in unprotected exposure.”The WHO also advises that relatives and visitors in contact with nCoV patients be limited to those “essential for patient support” and should be trained to use the same infection control precautions as healthcare workers use.The agency also recommends, among other things, that all staff members and visitors approaching within 1 meter of nCoV patients wear a medical mask, eye protection, gown, and gloves, and perform hand hygiene before and after patient contact.The WHO previously published recommendations on surveillance and clinical management for nCoV cases.Also today, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) published a brief epidemiologic update on the nCoV cases in Saudi Arabia.See also: May 6 Wall Street Journal storyMay 6 WHO infection control guidanceMay 7 ECDC epidemiologic updatelast_img read more

Genetic tests reveal more about new H5N6 reassortant

first_imgThe latest analysis of reassortant H5N6 avian flu viruses from South Korean wild birds and domestic ducks shows that the strain is a close relative of an H5N6 virus that first turned up in Greek poultry last season, but it has two mutations that might alter its susceptibility to neuraminidase inhibitors, according to an expert familiar the test results.In other avian flu developments, the animal health officials in the United Kingdom (UK) issued a new risk assessment for avian flu in Europe, and French veterinary authorities reported another low-pathogenic H5N3 outbreak in poultry.H5N6 mutations might lower susceptibilityViruses from recent outbreaks in South Korea underwent further analysis at the Animal and Plant Quarantine Agency of the Republic of Korea and the International Reference Laboratory in the UK government’s Animal and Plant Health Agency lab at Weybridge. And a reliable but anonymous source outlined the findings yesterday in a post to ProMED Mail, the online reporting system of the International Society for Infectious Diseases.Earlier this week, the Netherlands became the fifth country to report the H5N6 reassortant, which is different than the one that has caused human infections in China and has been found in poultry outbreaks in a few Asian countries. In November, South Korea reported its first outbreak involving the reassortant, which was quickly followed by detections in Japan and Taiwan.According to the source, phylogenetic analysis showed that the recent H5N6 virus from South Korea differs from the strain implicated in outbreaks last winter. Also, all genes except neuraminidase are from the European H5N8 lineage that triggered widespread outbreaks last season and is still causing sporadic outbreaks.The neuraminidase gene, most similar to the H5N6 reassortant detected in Greece last winter, is related to low-pathogenic Eurasian influenza A virus circulating in wild birds. The expert said, however, there are differences between the neuraminidases in the Greek and South Korean isolates, and one of the viruses can’t determine the risk for the whole lineage. “Indeed, the Korean isolate has 2 mutations, which might confer altered susceptibility to neuraminidase inhibitors.”The findings point to ongoing H5 lineage circulation in multiple geographic regions, likely spread by wild birds.Though so far sequence analysis doesn’t show that the virus poses a zoonotic threat, heightened vigilance should be maintained for potential spread from wild birds to poultry, the expert said. The source added that the findings also underscore the complex evolution of H5 clade 2.3.4.4 viruses that will likely have different phenotypic properties in a range of hosts, possibly including humans.DEFRA weighs H5N6, H5N8 threatsIn a new outbreak assessment update, the UK Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) said the recent H5N6 outbreak in the Netherlands probably reflects a new incursion into Europe, given that the only previous detection on the continent was the earlier poultry outbreak in Greece.The agency added that the same farm in the Netherlands was struck by an H5N8 outbreak last year. So far, early analysis suggests it is a reassortant between H5N8 and low-pathogenic H5N6.DEFRA also weighed in on the H5N8 threat, saying that since late October, outbreaks have continued, but at a lower rate than last season in just four countries: Russia, Italy, Germany, and Bulgaria.Wild migratory waterfowl have arrived from Asia for overwintering in northern Europe and the UK, and compared with this time last year, the outlook is more favorable for central Europe, with relatively fewer cases in wild birds. However, DEFRA added that it’s possible that wild birds have asymptomatic infections or are immune after exposure to the virus last season. Also, it’s possible that local birds could be maintaining the H5N8 virus, which could spread by other routes.With uncertainty about H5N8 prevalence in wild birds and the new development with the H5N6 ressortant, DEFRA is keeping the risk level at “medium” for now, with the risk staying at “low” for individual poultry farms.Low-path H5N3 in FranceIn outbreak developments, veterinary officials in France reported another low-pathogenic H5N3 outbreak, the second involving the strain this month, according to a report to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE).The new outbreak began on Dec 2 at a turkey breeding farm in Maine-et-Loire department in west central France. Farm workers noticed an excessive death rate and a drop in egg production in one of the facility’s four pens. The virus killed 30 of 9,200 turkeys, and the remaining ones are slated for culling.See also:Dec 12 ProMED Mail postDec 11 DEFRA reportDec 11 OIE report on H5N3 in Francelast_img read more

Why newspapers lack interest in court reporting

first_imgThe name Mike Taylor is not one that many lawyers will recognise, even though he has spent his entire working life writing about the law. In an extraordinary 42 years at the Press Association law courts news service, he reported countless cases in the High Court, Court of Appeal and House of Lords with speed and clarity. His reward was to see his words used by every news organisation in the country — though almost invariably under someone else’s byline. Taylor hit the age of 65 on Sunday and retired immediately. So far he has not been replaced. There used to be 25 reporters covering the law courts for Britain’s national news agency. Now, only four are left. That would matter less if newspapers still kept their own reporters at the law courts. But those days have gone, and not just because of the recession. Editors take the view that their readers no longer need to understand why the courts have reached a particular decision. It was against this background that the lord chief justice expressed concern last week about the decline in coverage of the courts, with local papers in particular no longer sending reporters to hearings. ‘If there is no one to walk in, the public interest is damaged. That is the harsh reality.’ Experience of local government reporting was also being lost, Lord Judge said in a speech to the Society of Editors. There was evidence that some weeklies were relying too much on council press offices and not enough on independent, objective reporting. ‘Just as an independent press can expose the errors made by local authorities and governments, so too, the administration of justice in the courts should be open to the public scrutiny which an independent press provides,’ Lord Judge told journalists. ‘Unless the right has been expressly taken away, your right to be in court is no different to and no less than the right of the lawyers, the advocates, even the judge himself or herself. You are not performing the same function as the judge, but you have a valued function to perform.’ Lord Judge’s comments were welcomed by Jack Straw when the lord chancellor launched a bill intended to allow reporters greater access to the family courts. ‘We want to create a system that is transparent, accountable, and inspires public confidence in its good work, while still protecting the privacy of children and families involved,’ Straw said. Although ‘accredited media representatives’ have been permitted to attend family courts since April, they are not allowed to report the substance of those proceedings without express permission from the court. Incidentally, bloggers and other freelance commentators are unlikely to qualify as accredited media representatives. Straw initially wanted new rules of court that would have allowed accredited reporters not only to cover hearings but also to inspect and report documents filed at court. Parties would have been permitted to disclose information about their cases to accredited media representatives who would then have been able to report this information — even if they had not been in court — unless a judge had ordered otherwise. There were plans for medical reports to be supplied in redacted form. But Straw was forced to water down his proposals in the summer after strong opposition from family judges. They feared that publication of medical reports could harm the children involved as well as discouraging experts from speaking frankly. Judges were also concerned that allowing journalists to interview parties would lead to self-serving accounts and do little to increase public understanding of the courts. They even suggested that Straw’s rules were unlawful. So instead of new, more open, rules that could have been in force by Christmas, we are to have much narrower primary legislation that cannot take effect before next spring at the earliest. The Children, Schools and Families Bill starts from the default position that it will be contempt of court to report family proceedings, apart from those that are open to the public. It then provides an exception for ‘authorised news publication’. But this is very narrowly defined. First, the information must have been obtained by the accredited media representative by observing or listening to proceedings that he or she was permitted to attend. Gone is the option of asking the lawyers to fill you in if you missed something. You can’t even ask another reporter. Second, the information must initially be published either by the representative or by someone the representative works for. So law firms will not be able to publish their own accounts of their own cases. Next, it must not be ‘identification information’ or ‘sensitive personal information’ or ‘restricted adoption information’ or ‘restricted parental order information’. Some of these restrictions may be lifted by the court, but only if this would be in the public interest or the interests of a party. Specific permission will be needed to report court judgments, and the court can still restrict publication of any information at the request of an interested person. The legislation may be reviewed after 18 months. But, in a final twist, it will reverse the burden of proof. If publishers want to avoid going to prison for contempt of court, it will be up to them to prove they ‘did not know and had no reason to suspect’ that the information they published was covered by these restrictions. There must be an overwhelming temptation to write about The X Factor instead. Only a child could imagine that the family courts will deliver a renaissance in court reporting.last_img read more

Bertens ends Venus’ days of living dangerously

first_imgThere was no great escape for Venus Williams on Friday as the five-times champion became the latest top-10 seed to perish at Wimbledon after she was beaten 6-2 6-7(5) 8-6 in a pulsating third-round match by Dutchwoman Kiki Bertens.The American, at 38 the oldest woman in the draw, had to recover from a set down in her first two matches but her days of living dangerously were ended by a opponent who simply would not give up.The precision serve that had gone AWOL during the first set – with the ninth seed holding serve only once – was back on target for Williams as she produced some exquisite volley winners to snap up the second set when Bertens smacked a forehand long.But all the effort she put into forcing a decider despite being two points from defeat in the second set came to nothing as Bertens played the match of her life to reach the second week at the All England Club for the first time in her career.Bertens had come agonisingly close to toppling Williams in Miami this year, when she had held three match points, and she seemed to have learned from that near miss as she dropped to her knees in triumph after watching the American net a backhand to end the two hour, 40 minute thriller.Williams’ defeat continued the horror show for women’s seeds at Wimbledon as only two of the top 10 – world number one Simona Halep and number seven Karolina Pliskova – are still in the tournament. It is the worst showing by the women’s seeds in the professional era. (Reporting by Pritha Sarkar, editing by Ed Osmond)last_img read more