Donald Trump: Without the US, the French would be speaking German

first_imgTrump’s tweet is his second over the past five days that accuses Macron of suggesting European nations need more robust militaries to protect themselves from the U.S., a mischaracterization of what the French president actually said. Macron, in an interview with Europe 1, suggested that Europe needs to better position itself militarily against an increasingly aggressive Russia.Macron also lamented a U.S. decision to withdraw from a treaty with Russia that prohibited the manufacture of intermediate range nuclear missiles. The “main victim” of that move, Macron said, is “Europe and its security.”“I believe in the project of a sovereign Europe. We won’t protect Europe if we don’t decide to have a true European army,” he said. “We have to have a Europe that can defend itself alone — and without only relying on the United States — in a more sovereign manner.”“We should protect ourselves when it comes to China, Russia and even the United States of America,” the French president also said, alluding to the decision to pull out of the missile treaty with Russia.Trump has repeatedly called for NATO allies to rely less on the U.S. for their defense and has railed against nations that he says do not put enough of their gross domestic product toward defense spending. Trump has regularly demanded that NATO countries increase their defense spending to a higher percentage of their GDP, forcing the issue at last summer’s NATO summit by seeming to threaten to pull the U.S. out of the pact if spending targets were not met.Macron, in his interview, agreed that Europe should become less dependent on the U.S. for its military. PARIS — U.S. President Donald Trump took several potshots at Emmanuel Macron on Tuesday, saying that in France “they were starting to learn German before the U.S. came along” during both World Wars.In response to Macron’s call for a “true European army,” Trump wrote on Twitter: “Emmanuel Macron suggests building its own army to protect Europe against the U.S., China and Russia. But it was Germany in World Wars One & Two — How did that work out for France? They were starting to learn German in Paris before the U.S. came along. Pay for NATO or not!”The tweet, and others that followed, was “made for Americans,” according to the office of the French presidency. “Never easy bringing up the fact that the U.S. must be treated fairly, which it hasn’t, on both Military and Trade,” Trump tweeted after he returned to the U.S.The pair held a meeting on Saturday morning to smooth over their differences but Macron also went on CNN — the U.S. cable network that Trump loathes — and gave an interview in which he said that while Europe should spend more on defense, he did not want the money going to purchases of American weapons and other hardware.Macron also gave a speech Sunday, saying “Patriotism is the opposite of nationalism,” which could have been taken as a rebuke of Trump declaring himself to be a “nationalist” in the run-up to the recent U.S. midterm elections.Red, red whineA short while later, Trump was back on Twitter — this time taking aim at French wine. The U.S. president — who owns vineyards but is a non-drinker — tweeted: “France makes excellent wine, but so does the U.S. The problem is that France makes it very hard for the U.S. to sell its wines into France, and charges big Tariffs, whereas the U.S. makes it easy for French wines, and charges very small Tariffs. Not fair, must change!”The EU — and not France — decides common external tariffs for products such as wine for every country in the bloc. Still, the president’s statement echoes longstanding frustration from the U.S. wine industry regarding market access in the European Union. The office of the French presidency said Trump’s tweets were “made for Americans.” Speaking to BFMTV, a spokesperson for the French presidency declined to comment on the series of tweets but added: “There is a link between the president of the Republic and Donald Trump.“Beyond tweets, what matters to us is that they speak several times per week about the problems in the world,” the spokesperson was cited as saying.The French ambassador to the United States, Gérard Araud, said that Trump had mischaracterized Macron’s comments about a “real European army,” the remark that sparked Trump’s ire. “For the sake of truth, Pres. @EmmanuelMacron didn’t say that EU needed an army ‘against the US.’ It was an erroneous press report.”French people on Twitter pointed out that Trump was criticizing Macron on the third anniversary of the Bataclan terror attacks in Paris.The Trump-Macron relationship, which began with warm words and long handshakes, has gone sour.Just after landing in Paris on Friday, Trump took to Twitter to call Macron’s comments “very insulting,” adding a new layer of tension to the weekend’s ceremonies, although the two leaders discussed the issue during Trump’s visit. Trump added: “The problem is that Emmanuel suffers from a very low Approval Rating in France, 26%, and an unemployment rate of almost 10%. He was just trying to get onto another subject. By the way, there is no country more Nationalist than France, very proud people-and rightfully so!”He followed this with “MAKE FRANCE GREAT AGAIN!”Trump wasn’t finished with his Twitter rant and addressed criticism that he missed events over the weekend because it was raining. “By the way, when the helicopter couldn’t fly to the first cemetery in France because of almost zero visibility, I suggested driving. Secret Service said NO, too far from airport & big Paris shutdown. Speech next day at American Cemetary in pouring rain! Little reported-Fake News!” Also On POLITICO Merkel joins Macron in calling for EU army to complement NATO By Maïa de La Baume and David M. Herszenhorn Macron’s ‘arms control’ deal for cyber warfare By Laurens Cerulus and Mark Scottlast_img read more

Hutchinson unleashes the Kraken

first_img Related Leading tyre manufacturer Hutchinson Tires has launched the latest addition to its MTB range, the Kraken Racing Lab – the French brand’s new XC / Trail tyre.A new addition to the Hutchinson’s XC / Trail range, the Kraken Racing Lab is the result of close collaboration between designers, engineers and XC Hutchinson athletes. The company’s objective has been to develop a fast, agile and reliable tyre… ‘thanks to the addition of high lateral knobs to allow maximum confidence in cornering or upon rough terrain.’The architecture of the Kraken’s knobs has been inspired by the Skeleton, which is billed as ‘the ultimate tyre in terms of performance.’ Developed in 29 x 2.30, the volume of the Kraken allows riders to run lower pressures to bring ‘maximum comfort and calm in the most chaotic moments.’The ultimate goal with the Kraken was also to design a tyre that would not be exclusive, only for XC athletes say, but to expand its use to any mountain bike addict and trail lover.Available in two constructions, ‘ultra-light 127 TPI’ or ‘ultra-versatile 66 TPI’ coupled with Hardskin bead-to-bead reinforcement, the Kraken Racing Lab aims to meet the needs of performance addicts as well as XC marathon competitors or trail enthusiasts.The Kraken complements Hutchinson Racing Lab’s range, inaugurated last year with the Griffus.Prices are: Racing Lab without Hardskin Reinforcement: £39.95; and Racing Lab with Hardskin Reinforcement : £44.95.www.hutchinsontires.comlast_img read more

Microcephaly case series points to need for expanded Zika screening

first_imgMicrocephaly screening for Zika complications in newborns might miss some birth defects, according to a long-awaited analysis of the first 1,500 suspected cases in Brazil, which revealed instances of brain damage in babies with normal head circumference, a team from Brazil reported yesterday.In the largest case series to date, published in The Lancet, researchers from Brazil said screening criteria should be adjusted to include signs and symptoms of brain abnormalities.In a related research development, pathology examination of postmortem samples from infants and fetuses from Brazil at US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) labs revealed Zika antigens, cell damage, but no sign of Zika outside of the central nervous system and no indication that other pathogens are involved.Defects in babies with normal head sizeIn the surveillance study, the researchers analyzed investigations completed as of Feb 27 by medical teams of 1,501 live-born babies with suspected microcephaly.Using clinical data from Brazil’s Ministry of Health, they grouped the cases into five categories based on neuroimaging and Zika virus lab findings. Categories ranged from definite microcephaly to discarded. The team also looked at head circumference, first-week mortality, and history of maternal rash.Of the total, 899 cases were discarded. Among the remaining 602, 76 were definite, 54 highly probable, 181 moderately probable, and 291 somewhat probable. Compared with the discarded cases, definite or probable ones had small head circumference, and mothers were more likely to have had a rash during pregnancy (21% vs 61%). Infants in the definite and probable groups were also four time more likely to die during the first week of life.The analysis also revealed brain abnormalities in babies with normal head size who were born to mothers who had a Zika-like rash in late pregnancy. The investigators noted that cranium development is generally complete by week 30 of gestation, so infants can be born with normal head size and still have brain damage. They also said the findings raise the possibility that Zika infection in newborns might lead to brain damage.Cesar Victora, MD, PhD, the study’s lead author, said in a Lancet press release, “Although we believe that the underreporting of microcephaly cases is rare during the epidemic, newborns infected with the virus late in pregnancy may go unreported due to their head size being within normal range.” He also noted that about a third of the mothers of babies in the definite and probable group reported no rash during pregnancy.Examination of all newborns during epidemic waves should be considered, Victora said, and he warned that because southern Brazil experienced a wave of Zika in early 2016, the country could see a second spike in microcephaly at the end of the year.In a related commentary in the same Lancet issue, two experts from Brazil said adding new neurologic symptom criteria to detect Zika cases would be useful for identifying all affected infants, but many medical settings don’t have the specialized personnel. The authors are Jorg Heukelbach, MD, MPH, PhD, a community health specialist from the School of Medicine at Federal University of Ceara, and Guilherme Loureiro Werneck, MD, PhD, with the epidemiology department at the State University of Rio de Janeiro.Another option would be incorporating an accurate serologic test into routine prenatal care, and they said validation of such a test should be a research priority.Damage in postmortem and placental samplesIn the pathology study, also published yesterday in The Lancet, researchers from the CDC and collaborators in Brazil analyzed tissue from three babies born with microcephaly who died and two placentas from mothers who miscarried at 11 and 13 weeks’ gestation. In all five instances, the mothers reported Zika symptoms during their first pregnancy trimesters.In the three fatal cases, investigators found Zika antigens in neurons and glial cells. Brain tissue analysis showed cell damage, calcium deposits, and death. Unlike for other infections such as herpes, they found no sign of substantial inflammatory response or specific structural effects.No evidence of Zika virus were found in other organ systems, and the three babies showed a range of birth defects and brain abnormalities.In placental samples from the two miscarriages, investigators found Zika virus antigens. For all five cases, tests ruled out other infectious causes.The authors said the mechanism that causes the birth defects still isn’t clear, but it is probably related to the virus attacking the nervous system, resulting in brain damage and muscle impairment.In an accompanying commentary, two US-based experts said though the CDC has concluded that Zika virus causes microcephaly, detections of Zika virus in tissues are scarce. The authors are Drucilla Roberts, MD, a pathologist at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), and Matthew Frosch, MD, PhD, a neuropathologist at MGH and Harvard University.They said more detailed pathology studies are needed to identify the full spectrum of Zika virus infection and to confirm the link to perinatal complications. Roberts and Frosch also recommended that future studies should include histopathologic examination of tissue at different gestational ages.”This report highlights that we can learn much about the pathogenesis of Zika virus congenital infection through careful pathological investigation, but leaves us with many questions for study,” the two wrote.Other developmentsThe CDC today reported 4 more Zika-related birth defects in US pregnant women, raising the total to 12 as of Jun 23. Three of the new cases involved live births, and one involved a pregnancy loss. The number of Zika-related birth defects in the US territories remained the same, at one. In other numbers updates, the CDC reported 22 more Zika infections in US pregnant women (raising the total to 287), and 34 more in pregnant women in the US territories (raising the total to 250). Regarding infections in the general population, the CDC reported 166 more cases in US territories where the virus is spreading locally, most of them in Puerto Rico. The total in the region stands at 2,020 now, and 3 more Guillain-Barre syndrome cases were reported, boosting the total to 10. US states reported 115 more Zika illnesses in travelers, increasing the total to 934, plus 2 more sexually transmitted Zika cases, putting that number at 13.Though most Americans have heard of Zika virus, only 13% are aware of the impact on adults and only half know that the virus can spread sexually, the Kaiser Family Foundation reported today in a health tracking poll for June. The poll also found widespread support for Zika funding, including assistance with reproductive services for women in outbreak areas in and outside of the United States.The CDC on Jun 28 added Anguilla to its level 2 travel notice for Zika virus. There are now 49 countries or territories listed among the CDC’s Zika travel advisories.See also:Jun 29 Lancet report on Zika microcephaly surveillanceJun 29 Lancet related commentaryJun 29 related Lancet press releaseJun 29 Lancet report on Zika birth defect pathologyJun 29 Lancet related commentaryJun 29 related Lancet press releaselast_img read more

Plans For Gas Station Property Not Yet Announced

first_imgZRG Investments pulled a commercial demolition permit in August for the gas station at the corner of Diamond Drive and Sandia, across the street from Los Alamos High School. The plan for the property has not yet been made public but check back at ladailypost.com for updates. Photo by Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.comlast_img

HFT introduces the PurgEye® 1000

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img