Colo. Didn’t Factor Risk in Earmarking Grants

first_imgThough the audit did not specify which risk level the Pikes Peak area falls under, Colorado Springs emergency management Director Bret Waters said he thinks the city could receive more help with its communications system if risk becomes a factor. Despite being near four major military bases, the city seems not to have gotten its fair share of homeland security dollars, he said. COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — Colorado officials have not considered risk when doling out grants for public-safety communications, leading to more money going to low-risk areas than to higher probability attack locations, according to an audit released Tuesday. While we have been very good at giving out money, the Department of Local Affairs has not used very sophisticated analysis or strategic thinking in regard to some of the grant programs we provide, said Kirkpatrick, who took over the department earlier this year. About $135 million in state and federal money has been put toward improving communications systems, including the creation of a digital trunked radio system that links first responders covering 86 percent of Colorado. The recently hired state homeland security coordinator, Mason Whitney, is working to develop more tools to conduct risk-based analyses, Kirkpatrick said. The report by the State Auditor s Office recommended the state create a process to better assess which areas need the funds. Department of Local Affairs Director Susan Kirkpatrick agreed with the suggestion and said such a process has begun. I think it s just a logical approach to do that, Waters said of increased risk analysis. When you re looking at a huge investment of dollars into interoperable communications, we need a clear plan of why we re spending that money. But the department did not prioritize communications needs on the basis of risk when making grant distributions, the audit stated. As a result, those areas at medium risk level received $9.2 million in grant funds from 2004-06, while low-risk areas got $11.1 million. The audit also found the Department of Personnel and Administration, which oversees the state s 7,400-item inventory of digital trunked radios, had not kept constant track of whether the agencies that own those emergency-communications radios still had them in their possession. Interoperable communications — essentially, allowing local and state public-safety agencies to be able to talk to each other during an emergency — have been a focus of homeland security spending in recent years. But the DPA information technology division director, Todd Olson, said officials conduct a thorough inventory once a year and have the ability to cut off a radio if they find it s fallen into the hands of someone who should not have it.CONTACT THE WRITER: (303) 837-0613 or [email protected]last_img read more

Homeless Man Reunited w/ Inheritance Thanks to Good Samaritan and Police

first_imgA receipt in one of the bags led them to a shopping mall. Security camera footage from one of the stores gave them a picture of who they were looking for — a homeless man police identified as “Joe.” But after days of searching, Detective Danny Mursell still couldn’t find him.A week after the money was lost, and while Mursell was working on something else, he just happened to spot Joe drinking coffee and reunited him with his traveling money.(WATCH the video below from WFOR News) – Photo by 401(K) 2013, CChttp://launch.newsinc.com/share.html?trackingGroup=69016&siteSection=latimes_hom_non_sec&videoId=29216968Help your friends find this story, share it (below)…AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreA volunteer on beach patrol who was looking for sea turtles, instead found a bag of money — and launched a week-long search to find its owner.Meanwhile, a homeless man who’d received an inheritance from a relative, was hoping to use the cash to return home to friends and family in Pennsylvania.The bag, discovered at a Florida bus stop bench, only contained half of his inheritance. A deputy sheriff spotted the other bag and together they contained nearly $10,000.Police believed it belonged to the same person, but finding him would take some detective work.5 Year-old Sings Grace for Homeless Man in Diner, Brings Tears (WATCH)last_img read more

Cruz Clobbers Twins Past Royals

first_img Auto (360p) About Connatix V56490 720p HD 360p The Minnesota Twins beat the Kansas City Royals 4-1 Monday night at Target Field. The Twins have rebounded from an early-August skid to win four of their past five games.Nelson Cruz provided the offense for Minnesota Monday with a pair of home runs, giving him eight on the season. Cruz is playing at an MVP level, with a .354 batting average and an American League-leading 23 runs batted in.The Twins did not use a traditional starting pitcher in the contest, instead relying on six relievers to hold the Royals scoreless until the ninth inning. The Twins’ homestand continues Tuesday night when they host the Brewers at Target Field. First pitch is set for 7:10 p.m. on WJON.MN Twins On CameoGetty ImagesThe Twins on CameoA number of Minnesota professional athletes will record a greeting to be sent to you, a friend or a loved one… for a price. Over 40 current and former Minnesota Vikings, Twins and Timberwolves players are on Cameo, a website that offers fans the opportunity to purchase a video message from athletes and celebrities for varying prices.Here’s a look at the Minnesota Twins who are currently available on Cameo and the price it will take to hire them to record your message.Getty ImagesMN Twins On CameoDevin Smeltzer – $15Getty ImagesMN Twins On CameoNelson Cruz – $100Getty ImagesMN Twins On CameoLewis Thorpe – $10. Aussie prospect. Triumph BooksMN Twins On CameoDick Bremer – $50Getty ImagesMN Twins On CameoChuck Knoblauch – $40. World Series hero and multi-time All Star with a checkered post-baseball runGetty ImagesMN Twins On CameoMatt Garza – $25. Debuted in 2006, Traded to Tampa in ’07. Getty ImagesMN Twins On CameoDenard Span – $25Getty ImagesMN Twins On CameoBrent Rooker – $20. Twins prospect, has not yet played in MLB. Getty ImagesMN Twins On CameoChris Colabello – $35. Remember him? He played seven years of Indy ball before landing with the Twins in 2012center_img 1080p HD 1/1 About Connatix V56490 Visit Advertiser website GO TO PAGE Skip last_img read more

Saliva Key to New Vaccine

first_imgThe saliva of a fly may save human lives–if researchers can transform it into a vaccine. A new study shows that sand flies, tiny insects that transmit a parasitic disease called leishmaniasis, also secrete a protein in their saliva that protects mice against the disease. The researchers believe a similar vaccine may one day protect humans.If true, it would be one of the strangest vaccines ever. Almost all existing vaccines directly target a pathogen–whether it’s a virus, a bacterium, or a parasite. Instead, this experimental vaccine goes for one of the carrier’s proteins. “It’s a very intriguing and promising approach,” says epidemiologist Barbara Herwaldt of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. Herwaldt says the vaccine would also be a welcome new weapon in the battle against leishmaniasis, a disease that afflicts about 2 million people a year and can disfigure the face or kill.All blood-sucking insects have small arsenals of chemicals in their saliva–including blood vessel dilators and anticlotting agents–that help them guzzle blood. In the late ’80s, researchers discovered that these cocktails are vital to some parasites too: When injected without saliva, Leishmania, the parasite that causes leishmaniasis, couldn’t cause an infection. What if the immune system could learn to block the action of saliva? A team led by José Ribeiro of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) showed in 1998 that inoculation with sand fly saliva could protect mice from the disease.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Of course, practical and safety issues make vaccinating people with insect spit impossible. So in their new study, which appears in the 6 August issue of the Journal of Experimental Medicine, Ribeiro’s team isolated the 12 major proteins in the saliva of the sand fly Phlebotomus papatasi. One protein, which they called SP-15, seemed best at protecting mice. When vaccinated with a DNA vaccine based on SP-15, all animals eliminated the parasites, while a control group remained infected and developed large skin ulcers.Although the mechanism isn’t nailed down, Ribeiro suspects that the vaccine triggers a localized immune reaction, called delayed hypersensitivity. Immune messenger molecules called cytokines and certain types of immune cells race to the bite site, making it inhospitable for the parasite.Related sitesLeishmania information from the CDC, including a leishmaniasis fact sheetMore about the saliva of blood-sucking insectsJosé Ribeiro’s home pagelast_img read more