Man Returns to Poor Neighborhood Where He Grew Up So He Can Give Away $12,000 in Free Toys

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorePhoto by Lauren WilhelmChristmas came early for the children living in these low-income neighborhoods and housing complexes.That’s because a former resident of the area returned to the streets where he grew up so he could hand out more than $12,000 worth of toys to the local children earlier this week.Adam Armstrong grew up poor in a mostly government-subsidized apartment complex in Harrisonburg, Virginia. When he was just 18 years old, he was sent to jail to serve a 3-month sentence for marijuana possession. By the time he was released, he knew that it was time to turn his life around. Armstrong, who is now the father of a 3-year-old girl, ended up moving to Baltimore and working a string of different jobs until he finally got into the mortgaging business.RELATED: After ‘Mountain Santa’ Dad Spent 42 Years Giving Away Gifts to Poor Families, His Son Decides to Do the SameAs Armstrong became more and more financially comfortable, he felt more and more compelled to give back to people living in poverty—so he began donating heaps of toys to local charities every holiday season.This week, the 35-year-old philanthropist drove to his former neighborhood in a 26-foot moving truck packed with 1,327 toys to give away to all of the children.Sara Lewis-Weeks, the property manager of the complex, says that when Armstrong had approached her about the giveaway last week, she had been wary of his intentions.Photo by Lauren Wilhelm“He comes [into my office] and says, ‘What are you doing on Saturday? I’d like to give away a lot of toys’ and I’m like, ‘Yeaaah, I don’t know about that,’” Lewis-Weeks recounted to NBC News. “I’m very skeptical at that point.”To her astonishment, however, Armstrong made good on his promise.“It wasn’t like stuffed animals—he was giving away bikes, remote-controlled cars, real Barbie dolls—not Dollar Store Barbie dolls,” says Weeks. “He didn’t miss anybody. His heart was truly in this.CHECK OUT: Dying 86-Year-old Bought 14 Years Worth of Christmas Gifts for His 2-Year-old Neighbor“They thought it was going to be a couple of stuffed animals, not, ‘And you get a bike, and you get a bike, and you get a bike,’—like an ‘Oprah’ for little kids,” she added.Armstrong simply told The Washington Post that he was happy to bring joy to little kids for the holiday season.“The kids were so innocent and sweet,” Armstrong told the news outlet. “You can’t put a price on looking at these kids’ happy faces. Some of them have nothing, and to be able to give them a small toy … the reward and the pleasure was mine.”(WATCH the news coverage below)Be Sure And Share The Sweet Story Of Holiday Cheer With Your Friends On Social Media…AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

PICOR reports recent transactions

first_imgCODAC Behavioral Health Services purchased the 18,606 square foot office building located at 1025-1075 E. Fort Lowell in Tucson from Ventura Canyon Property, LLC. Tom Knox, SIOR and Paul Hooker, with Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR, represented the buyer. Dan Wesson with The Waterfall Group represented the seller in this transaction.Marana Health Center, Inc. leased 16,243 square feet, filling nine suites at 3690 S. Park Avenue in Tucson from William Lee, LLC. Ron Zimmerman, Commercial Specialist with Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR, represented the landlord in this transaction.last_img read more