Ash Institute announces system reform semifinalists

first_imgEarlier this month, the Ash Institute for Democratic Governance and Innovation at Harvard Kennedy School (HKS) announced eight semifinalists for the 2008 Annie E. Casey Innovations Award in Children and Family System Reform. These government programs were selected from a pool of 100 applicants and offer tangible solutions to children and family services issues. The 2008 winner will receive a $100,000 award toward replication and dissemination of best practices.The Annie E. Casey Innovations Award in Children and Family System Reform was created in 2004 to highlight successful innovation in public systems affecting children and families, and to encourage other systems to adopt these reforms. Through a partnership with the Annie E. Casey Foundation and the Ash Institute for Democratic Governance and Innovation, this annual award encourages improvements in public policy to support disadvantaged children and families.After a series of thorough rounds of evaluation, a panel of child and family service policy experts selected the semifinalists. Five state, one county, and two city programs make up the semifinalist group. Finalists will be announced June 3, and the winner will be honored at an awards gala in September.“The eight semifinalists have shown us that effective and innovative programs can play a role in improving the futures of children and strengthening children and family service programs,” said Douglas W. Nelson, president and CEO of the Annie E. Casey Foundation. “This is the third year that we are funding this Award, which we feel contributes meaningfully to the Casey Foundation’s mission: improving opportunities and outcomes for America’s most vulnerable children and families.”Established in 1985 at HKS by the Ford Foundation, the Innovations in American Government Awards Program has honored 181 federal, state, and local government agencies over its 23-year history. The program provides concrete evidence that government can work to improve the quality of life of citizens. Many award-winning programs have been replicated across jurisdictions and policy areas and serve as forerunners for today’s reform strategies and new legislation.“The semifinalists for the Annie E. Casey Innovations Award in Children and Family System Reform are at the forefront of some of our nation’s most pressing children and family challenges,” said Daniel Paul Professor of Government Stephen Goldsmith, director of the Innovations in American Government Awards Program. “They are bringing about core reforms in how we treat domestic violence, juvenile justice, and foster care issues.”The semifinalists for the 2008 Annie E. Casey Innovations Award in Children and Family System Reform follow:• Child welfare reform, state of Maine: Motivated by the vision that every child needs a family, Maine has achieved child welfare reform over the past six years through conscious, data-driven management.• Construyendo Circulos de Paz/Constructing Circles of Peace: Santa Cruz County, Ariz.: A long-term, restorative justice counseling program that brings together multiple stakeholders (perpetrators, victims, families, and community members) in response to crimes of domestic violence.• Division of Youth Services, state of Missouri: A national model for juvenile justice reform, Missouri’s Division of Youth Services has achieved exemplary results and cost-effectiveness through regionally based, small, humane treatment centers; group and family systems approaches; universal case management; and community engagement.• Family Civil Intake Screen Process, state of Connecticut: A scientifically validated, comprehensive assessment methodology designed to identify parenting conflicts and match the dynamics of the family with a corresponding array of evidence-based alternative dispute resolution services.• No Child Left Inside, state of Connecticut: This initiative reconnects families to nature by exposing them to outdoor recreational opportunities, thus growing healthier kids, fostering environmental stewards, and showcasing the joy of playing outside.• Positive Youth Development, city of Washington, District of Columbia: The nation’s first juvenile justice agency that strives to meet the needs of young people by building their competencies and enabling them to become successful adults.• Project Zero, New York City: Department of Probation project that enhances public safety and reduces the number of juvenile delinquents removed from home and incarcerated in New York state facilities through family-focused, community-based programs.• Youth Leadership Advisory Team, state of Maine: A program that engages youth in foster care with state and federal policymakers to create significant improvements in child welfare policies, legislation, and programs.last_img read more

Water Distribution Affects Exoplanets Habitable Zone

first_imgWarmer temperatures and more surface water both cause more water vapor to enter a planet’s atmosphere. If more heat is coming into the atmosphere in the form of solar radiation than the amount of heat that is being expelled as outgoing planetary radiation, the planet gets hotter. This causes more evaporation and more water vapor, subsequently trapping more heat and causing a runaway greenhouse cycle. The researchers used three-dimensional models to simulate the different ways a set volume of water on land planets could be distributed. In one model, the water was distributed closer to the planet’s poles. In the other, water was scattered away from the poles. Mars is an example of a potentially Earth-like planet that lost its liquid water and atmosphere. Courtesy/NASA/JPL/USGS “Our results showed the inner edge of the habitable zone is not a single, sharp boundary, but a border whose location changes depending on the planetary surface environment,” said Takanori Kodama, an astrophysicist at the University of Bordeaux in Bordeaux, France, and lead author of the new study. AGU News: Distance to the central star, thickness of the atmosphere, and the amount of water on a planet can affect where its habitable zone lies. The new research in AGU’s Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, finds where water is distributed on land also impacts how close some types of planets can be to their central star without losing all their water. Water in the habitable zone “Small differences in the amount of water cause significant differences in planets’ climates,” Kodama said. Earth is an example of an aqua planet that maintains its water in a habitable zone. This image of Earth taken by the spacecraft Galileo shows its vast Pacific Ocean. Courtesy/NASA/JPL The new study finds land planets, which have equal to or less than 10 percent of the volume of Earth’s water, can remain habitable at a closer distance to their host star if most of their water is at the planet’s poles. This means the habitable zone for these types of planets may be different than previously assumed.center_img They found land planets with more water at their equator have wetter atmospheres, sending them into a greenhouse state. Land planets with water near their poles have drier atmospheres around their tropical regions, because the water vapor does not circulate up to the equator. Those land planets can maintain their water when they are closer to their central stars. Because life on Earth requires liquid water, researchers looking for life beyond Earth’s solar system search for exoplanets that orbit their star within a “habitable zone” where the planet is neither frozen in ice nor completely dry. Kodama previously established the total amount of water a land planet has can affect how close it can be to its central star before the amount of water vapor thickens the atmosphere and sends the planet into a runaway greenhouse state. After this water vapor threshold is reached, all the planet’s water eventually disappears through evaporation caused by heat accumulation. On habitable planets, incoming solar radiation and outgoing planetary radiation are balanced. Aqua planets, like Earth, have narrow habitable zones because their water-heavy atmospheres limit outgoing planetary radiation while insulating solar radiation, creating a buildup of heat. Land planets have a wider habitable zone, because they have less water in their atmospheres. The new study examines how water distribution on land planets influences how close they can exist to their host star without entering a runaway greenhouse state. The new results indicate that how close a planet can be to its host star and remain habitable also depends on the planet’s surface water distribution in addition to its overall amount of water. Land planets with drier equators can live closer to their stars. Earth-like exoplanets with dry tropical regions can remain habitable at a closer distance to their host star than previously thought, a new study suggests. The amount of water a planet has limits how close it can be to the heat of its star. Water vapor in the air traps heat like a greenhouse, insulating the planet and making its surface much warmer than it normally would be.last_img read more

Sun shines on Blackman

first_imgAndrew Blackman (center) with Tommy Marshall (left) and Carl Lovatt.PSC Golf from the Pattaya Links Golf SocietyMonday, Sept. 23, Bangpakong – Stableford1st Andrew Blackman (9) 40pts2nd Stuart Brown (28) 38pts 3rd Barry Oats (30) 38pts4th Petur Petursson (6) 37ptsIt was drizzling rain in Pattaya as the bus and cars set off, but hopes were high for a dryer day than of late. Well the sun certainly shone on Andrew Blackman as he recorded a convincing win, racking up 40 points in his final outing this trip.Second place became a tussle between two high handicappers as Stu Brown and Barry Oats both had 38 points. Stu had the better back nine. Petur Petursson rounded out the placings with an excellent 37 points off his handicap of six to record the lowest gross of the day.Near pins went to Andrew Blackman (A flight), Takeshi Hakozaki (A flight), Stu Brown (B flight),Consolation ‘best nines’ by non-winners came from Stuart Thompson (front, 16pts) and Rowan Lucas (back, 20pts).Friday, Sept. 27, Pattavia – Stableford1st Takeshi Hakozaki (14) 38pts2nd George Mueller (15) 36pts3rd Phil Davies (13) 35pts4th Andrew Purdie (10) 35ptsIn contrast to our previous game, it was back to our, currently, usual numbers as twenty three golfers headed for Pattavia.Weather was fine and stayed that way for all but the final group which had some drizzle approaching the last hole. Once again the course was in immaculate condition and the greens are still sensibly paced, but we need to be aware of lots of tricky contoursThe scores were on the low side of usual here, but golf journeyman Takeshi Hakozaki found enough of the course to his liking to have 38 points on his card at the end. Takeshi is a consistent golfer and this was not his first Green Jacket.George Mueller who had a day we know he is capable of, but not regularly enough, came in second with 36 points. Then Phil Davies won a countback over Andrew Purdie for third place, both with good scores of 35 points.Near pins went to Andrew Purdie (A flight), Kevin LaBar (A flight), Bill Stewart (B flight), and once again one green failed to attract a ball.Keith Melbourne returned from the UK with a nice bottle of drink with a Black Label, which he put up for a prize. Thank You Keith, from Rowan Lucas who won the long putt contest and the bottle.Consolation ‘best nines’ were posted by Petur Petursson (front, 19pts) and Steve Jones (back, 20pts).Rowan Lucas, a visitor from Australia, had a mixed day. Winning the long putt wasn’t his only claim to fame as he also had the worst score for the day and was presented with the “wig”.last_img read more

Windsurfers championed for SEA Games success

first_imgThe Windsurf Association subsequently sent the athletes to hone their skills in the RSX World Champions 2017 in Japan in September to prepare for the next Olympic Games, also to be held in Japan in 2020.  ‘Oat’ Natta­pong is currently ranked number 50 in the world in the Gold and Silver fleet and this month both he and Daow will remain in Pattaya and practice locally to prepare for upcoming competitions.Pattaya councilors at the meeting congratulated the two sailors on their achievements and stated that they are proud to have such skilled youths to represent Thailand and Pattaya, bringing joy to the country.  Thailand’s windsurfing has now stepped up to yet another level and looks set to grow further going forward. ‘Oat’ Nattapong Phonoparat (left) and ‘Daow’ Siriporn Kaewduang-ngam (right) wear their gold medals at a civic reception to celebrate their SEA Games success, held at the Surf Kitchen Restaurant in Jomtien on October 1.Pattaya windsurfers brought back pride and joy from the 29th Sea Games, held in Malaysia in August, returning with 2 gold medals and contributing to Thailand finishing runners-up to the host nation in the final overall medal table.A special ceremony was held at the Surf Kitchen Restaurant in Jomtien on October 1 to celebrate the success of the Thai windsurfing team.  Many civic dignitaries were in attendance to congratulate the victorious sailors including former city mayor Ittipol Khunplume, president of the Windsurf Association Pattaya and Vice Admiral Sorayut Danegtet, vice president of the Windsurf Association Thailand.Support Pattaya Mail – Click HereThe two gold medals performances came in the RS1 Mens competition, with ‘Oat’ Nattapong Phonoparat emerging as the champion, and the RS1 Womens category where ‘Daow’ Siriporn Kaewduang-ngam proved to be too good for her international rivals.last_img read more

Family, friends and former pupils bid farewell

first_imgBy LACHLAN MOORHEAD ANDREW Groh’s smiling face looked down from the screen inside the Berwick Church of Christ where hundreds…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

Sarsfields Book Place In All-Ireland Senior Camogie Club Final

first_imgThe Sarsfields Panel before yesterday’s All-Ireland Club Semi-Final with St Vincents. print WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Email Michael McGrath’s side were 1-13 to 0-8 winners over St Vincents from Dublin while defending champions Slaughtneil were 2-10 to 1-10 winners over Scariff in the other Semi-Final. Sarsfields will play Slaughtneil in the AIB All-Ireland Senior Club Final on the 1st of March following their Semi-Final win yesterday afternoon. Here is the match report from Tommy DevaneAfter the game, Tommy spoke to Sarsfields Manager Michael McGrathTommy then spoke to Player of the Match Siobhan McGrathlast_img read more

New Orleans Falls at No. 44 LSU

first_imgAnja Luethi pushed Skylar Kuykendall deep into each set before falling to the 87th-ranked singles player in the nation. Luethi lost her match 7-5, 6-4 at the 2 spot. The rest of the rotation for LSU swept through with no player from the 3-through-6 position losing more than five games. Next up for the Privateers is a doubleheader on Saturday against SUNO at 11 a.m. and Xavier at 3 p.m. on Saturday. No. 44 LSU 6, New Orleans 1NEW ORLEANS, La. – The New Orleans Privateers women’s tennis team (3-4, 0-1) was overpowered 6-1 by the 44th-ranked LSU Tigers (7-2) on Wednesday evening at City Park. In singles, Calderon earned the only Privateers point. Calderon won the first set in a tiebreak, but was trailing 3-1 in the second set when Scott retired from the match. The win moved Calderon to 3-2 in singles play on the spring. The Privateers began the evening, falling at the 2 and 3 positions in doubles. Marta Sans and Soledad Calderon Arroyo were ahead 4-2 at the 1 position against Joana Vale Costa and Noel Scott, but that match went unfinished after the Tigers wrapped up the first point.last_img read more