Student Uses Coupon Clipping Skills to Buy $100,000 of Products for the Poor

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreReality TV shows are good for something, it turns out.A 16-year-old girl actually learned a valuable skill while watching “Extreme Couponing,” and has turned it into a philanthropic powerhouse for aiding people in hospitals and homeless shelters.Instead of hoarding a stash of goodies, she uses those coupon skills to deliver food, household and personal supplies, and electronics to people in need. Hannah Steinberg has delivered many thousands of dollars worth of products by being a savvy shopper, stockpiling the goods that she buys super cheap–and continues the effort, even while in college, through her own nonprofit.SHOP FOR FREE GOOD NEWS WITH OUR APP—>  Download FREE for Android and iOSThe Tufts University student runs her nationally recognized nonprofit, “Our Coupons Care” in Massachusetts.A youth coordinator at Coachman Family Center in White Plains says Hannah has donated $100,000 in products to that shelter alone, helping the 175 children living there.By understanding how “Extreme Couponing” works, Hannah tracks deals and stacks coupons and other offers together in combinations, which slashes the price of items to tiny fractions of their usual cost.RELATED:  Woman Donates Entire Toy Store to Kids in Homeless SheltersFunneling the money her nonprofit raises into buying more bargains lets her multiply every dollar’s purchasing power by five.She’s done so much good for her community, she has earned recognition by New York congressional leaders and her city of Scarsdale declared a Hannah Steinberg Day.“This has become something so much bigger than I would’ve imagined, for me and for the families,” Hannah told the Boston Globe. “What I’m doing is very simple.”CHECK OUT:  Food Stamps Double Their Value at Michigan Farmers MarketsEven in college, she finds time to organize a new donation drive almost every month and has rounded up donations for the Toys for Tots campaign and for Boston Children’s Hospital among her other causes.(READ more at the Boston Globe) — Photo: Chris Potter, CCShop This Story Around To Your Friends…AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Genetic tests reveal more about new H5N6 reassortant

first_imgThe latest analysis of reassortant H5N6 avian flu viruses from South Korean wild birds and domestic ducks shows that the strain is a close relative of an H5N6 virus that first turned up in Greek poultry last season, but it has two mutations that might alter its susceptibility to neuraminidase inhibitors, according to an expert familiar the test results.In other avian flu developments, the animal health officials in the United Kingdom (UK) issued a new risk assessment for avian flu in Europe, and French veterinary authorities reported another low-pathogenic H5N3 outbreak in poultry.H5N6 mutations might lower susceptibilityViruses from recent outbreaks in South Korea underwent further analysis at the Animal and Plant Quarantine Agency of the Republic of Korea and the International Reference Laboratory in the UK government’s Animal and Plant Health Agency lab at Weybridge. And a reliable but anonymous source outlined the findings yesterday in a post to ProMED Mail, the online reporting system of the International Society for Infectious Diseases.Earlier this week, the Netherlands became the fifth country to report the H5N6 reassortant, which is different than the one that has caused human infections in China and has been found in poultry outbreaks in a few Asian countries. In November, South Korea reported its first outbreak involving the reassortant, which was quickly followed by detections in Japan and Taiwan.According to the source, phylogenetic analysis showed that the recent H5N6 virus from South Korea differs from the strain implicated in outbreaks last winter. Also, all genes except neuraminidase are from the European H5N8 lineage that triggered widespread outbreaks last season and is still causing sporadic outbreaks.The neuraminidase gene, most similar to the H5N6 reassortant detected in Greece last winter, is related to low-pathogenic Eurasian influenza A virus circulating in wild birds. The expert said, however, there are differences between the neuraminidases in the Greek and South Korean isolates, and one of the viruses can’t determine the risk for the whole lineage. “Indeed, the Korean isolate has 2 mutations, which might confer altered susceptibility to neuraminidase inhibitors.”The findings point to ongoing H5 lineage circulation in multiple geographic regions, likely spread by wild birds.Though so far sequence analysis doesn’t show that the virus poses a zoonotic threat, heightened vigilance should be maintained for potential spread from wild birds to poultry, the expert said. The source added that the findings also underscore the complex evolution of H5 clade 2.3.4.4 viruses that will likely have different phenotypic properties in a range of hosts, possibly including humans.DEFRA weighs H5N6, H5N8 threatsIn a new outbreak assessment update, the UK Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) said the recent H5N6 outbreak in the Netherlands probably reflects a new incursion into Europe, given that the only previous detection on the continent was the earlier poultry outbreak in Greece.The agency added that the same farm in the Netherlands was struck by an H5N8 outbreak last year. So far, early analysis suggests it is a reassortant between H5N8 and low-pathogenic H5N6.DEFRA also weighed in on the H5N8 threat, saying that since late October, outbreaks have continued, but at a lower rate than last season in just four countries: Russia, Italy, Germany, and Bulgaria.Wild migratory waterfowl have arrived from Asia for overwintering in northern Europe and the UK, and compared with this time last year, the outlook is more favorable for central Europe, with relatively fewer cases in wild birds. However, DEFRA added that it’s possible that wild birds have asymptomatic infections or are immune after exposure to the virus last season. Also, it’s possible that local birds could be maintaining the H5N8 virus, which could spread by other routes.With uncertainty about H5N8 prevalence in wild birds and the new development with the H5N6 ressortant, DEFRA is keeping the risk level at “medium” for now, with the risk staying at “low” for individual poultry farms.Low-path H5N3 in FranceIn outbreak developments, veterinary officials in France reported another low-pathogenic H5N3 outbreak, the second involving the strain this month, according to a report to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE).The new outbreak began on Dec 2 at a turkey breeding farm in Maine-et-Loire department in west central France. Farm workers noticed an excessive death rate and a drop in egg production in one of the facility’s four pens. The virus killed 30 of 9,200 turkeys, and the remaining ones are slated for culling.See also:Dec 12 ProMED Mail postDec 11 DEFRA reportDec 11 OIE report on H5N3 in Francelast_img read more

City Quartet Attend Trust’s Holiday Camp

first_imgCommunity Trust’s head of operations Dan White expressed his gratitude to the players for attending, saying: “I am extremely grateful to the four players for taking the time to come and visit our holiday camps. “For the children to get the opportunity to play alongside their heroes is something special. All the children and the players left with beaming smiles on their faces. “Community engagement is vital for the club and these camps demonstrate the club really is based at the heart of the community. “”This is the second time we have delivered our camps at South Bristol Sports Centre and once again it has been hugely successful, both in terms of numbers and the standard of delivery.  “Our relationship with the venue is continually strengthening, and we now deliver several sessions at South Bristol Sports Centre each week, for males and females of all ages and abilities.” The Trust will be hosting a football-fun holiday camp over the Easter holidays. The dates will be released shortly, so keep an eye on the Trust’s website. Packed with skill sessions, speed guns, target cages and small-sided matches, Lee Tomlin, Josh Brownhill, Hordur Magnusson and Scott Golbourne surprised the participants on Friday as they took time out to visit to the camp. The coaching sessions took place at South Bristol Sports Centre for just the second time, following on from its recently launched partnership with the club. “The facilities are unbelievable and to have 150 kids every day just shows how big Bristol is,” said Tomlin. “I’ve really enjoyed it. You can see how much fun the kids have had and they all want to learn. It’s good for the future of Bristol.”last_img read more

High school volleyball: Haughton continues domination of District 1-II; Parkway gets win

first_imgJaycie Keith had six kills. Reagan Jorstad had three aces. Arielle Emanuel had six aces and five kills. Averi Phillips hadeight assists. Haughton has won 27 sets in district play without a loss. TheLady Bucs can complete a 30-0 run with a straight sets win over BTW. They gaveup just 26 points against the Lady Lions in the first round of district play. The Lady Panthers improved to 17-10. At No. 35 in the latestpower rankings, Parkway needs to move up at least three spots to make theplayoffs in the program’s third season. Catherine Hudson had three kills. Taralyn Sweeney and BrooklynnBockhaus had two each. Mia McWilliams had a whopping 24 aces against Huntington. Shealso had 13 assists. At No. 21 in the Division II power rankings, Haughton will likelybe on the road in the first round of the playoffs. The Lady Bucs have fourregular-season matches left to improve their position. The top 16 teams in thefinal rankings are at home in the first round. The Haughton Lady Bucs wrapped up the outright District 1-IIchampionship with a dominating victory over the Huntington Lady Raiders onTuesday at Haughton. The Lady Bucs allowed just 23 points in the 25-8, 25-8, 25-7victory. Elsewhere Tuesday, Benton lost to Byrd 25-20, 25-22, 25-11 in aDistrict 1-I match at Benton. The Lady Tigers, a second-year program, droppedto 4-13. Parkway defeated Alexandria 25-20, 25-13, 25-7 on Monday at home. Haughton improved to 11-12 overall and 9-0 in district. The LadyBucs close district play Wednesday at Booker T. Washington. The Lady Panthers host Loyola College Prep Thursday. Aftermatches against West Monroe and North Caddo, Parkway closes the regular seasonin the Dunham tournament Nov. 1 and 2.Perfect-Dating.comAre You Ready to Meet Cool Guys in Tung Chung?Perfect-Dating.com|SponsoredSponsoredUndoTheTopFiveVPNThe Secret Netflix Doesn’t Want You To Know To Unblock RestrictionsTheTopFiveVPN|SponsoredSponsoredUndoAspireAbove.comRemember Abby from NCIS? Take A Deep Breath Before You See How She Looks NowAspireAbove.com|SponsoredSponsoredUndoNews gadgetThis watch takes the whole country by storm! it’s price? Ridiculous!News gadget|SponsoredSponsoredUndoTheTopFiveVPNThe Trick Netflix Doesn’t Want You To Know To Unlock RestrictionsTheTopFiveVPN|SponsoredSponsoredUndoCelebsland.com9 Celebrity Before-And-After Plastic Surgery DisastersCelebsland.com|SponsoredSponsoredUndolast_img read more