HSE Smoking Service to hold information session in Letterkenny

first_img Pinterest Facebook Pregnant women can receive Covid vaccine at LYIT’s vaccination centre RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Homepage BannerNews WhatsApp Twitter The HSE Smoking Cessation Service in Donegal is running an information day at Letterkenny Shopping Centre tomorrow to mark the fact that Sunday last was World No Tobacco Day.It follows the implementation of the Smoke Free Campus policy at 11 community hospitals and nursing units across Donegal yesterday.Smoking Cessation Officer Fiona Boyle says they are having considerable success in Donegal……..Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/fionaweb.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Pinterest Previous articleCrimestoppers launches cross border appeal for information on Andrew Allen murderNext articleContract signed for next phase of Derry – Belfast rail line works admin LUH still not ready to restore IT systems Google+center_img Twitter WhatsApp Gardai investigate deaths of two horses on the N56 Facebook Lárionad Acmhainní Nádúrtha CTR to take part in new research project Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Google+ By admin – June 2, 2015 HSE Smoking Service to hold information session in Letterkennylast_img read more

T-Mobile wants to eat your lunch

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by. Robert McGarveyNew mobile competitors are calling, and they want your lunch.How many nibbles can a credit union absorb before its sustenance is devoured by hungry competitors?  That’s the question financial tech guru Jim Marous, senior vice president, business development at New Control, asks.“You can’t sit there and do nothing. The marketplace is changing completely. You need to take action to defend yourself,” Marous said.That is why Marous pointedly asks: Does T-Mobile want to steal 30% of your customers?Mobile Money, introduced by T-Mobile in late January, is the immediate threat. A mobile app coupled with a prepaid Visa card, the product does not presently involve paper checks but, beyond that, it can do much of what a conventional share draft account can do. continue reading »last_img read more

Don’t worry about stuffy courts, says HMCTS

first_imgFind advice and updates here. Please see the Gazette’s dedicated coronavirus page here >> Ventilation in courtrooms should not concern users, according to the government’s response to worries about stuffy courts, saying the risk of transmitting coronavirus through the air is ‘extremely low’.HM Courts & Tribunals Service said nothing beyond what is normally expected in workplaces is needed to regulate air flow and ventilation. Where normal air-handling systems are in operation – or where windows can be opened – rooms should be considered safe, it said.In a letter to the Criminal Bar Association (CBA), HMCTS said it had consulted public health officials, who advised that the risk of transmission of Covid-19 through an airborne route is ‘extremely low’.The CBA had raised concerns with the government about stuffy courtrooms, and asked whether the fact that parties often speak loudly in a court setting had been taken into account. It was assured that the risk assessments for the courts address the airflow management system.Jury trials have now re-started in Reading, Warwick, Winchester, Manchester Minshull Street, Bristol, Cardiff and the Old Bailey. In her weekly message, chair of the CBA Caroline Goodwin QC said court buildings ‘look and feel very different’ and ‘the effort by the staff has been nothing short of impressive’.‘If someone were to ask me would I go into court and conduct a hearing. The answer would be yes,’ she said. center_img *The Law Society is keeping the coronavirus situation under review and monitoring the advice it receives from the Foreign & Commonwealth Office and Public Health England.last_img read more

Capacity expansion flags up asset management challenges

first_imgINTRO: Attention to vehicle and track component life at high axleloads has enabled BHP Billiton Iron Ore to boost the capacity of its Mount Newman rail operationsBYLINE: Mike Darby, Peter Mutton and Graham Tew ** Mike Darby is Vice-President, Railroad, at BHP Billiton Iron Ore Pty Ltd. Peter Mutton is Associate Director of the Institute of Railway Technology at Monash University, and Graham Tew is Director of the Institute.GROWTH in the international iron ore market has spurred BHP Billiton Iron Ore (originally Mount Newman Mining) to expand the capacity of its heavy haul rail network in Western Australia. The A$77m PACE (Port And Capacity Expansion) programme due for completion by the end of this year is intended to boost annual carryings from around 70 million to over 100 million tonnes (RG 9.03 p531).The expansion programme has already seen the opening of the recently-completed 38 km branch from the Yandi line south to Mining Area C, increasing the total network to 734 route-km. Other developments include increasing the number and length of passing loops to accommodate more and longer trains.Expansion of the wagon fleet will come from the addition of 250 wide-bodied gondola cars. The bodies for all new vehicles are being assembled from corrosion-resistant steel to minimise long-term structural degradation (top). The latest cars are fitted with an upgraded design of three-piece bogie which will permit operation with 40 tonne axleloads in the future.For many years, BHP Billiton Iron Ore has increased capacity on its predominantly single-track railway by raising axleloads. In doing so it has achieved rolling stock productivity levels that are the best in the world1. This strategy has been supported by an ongoing research and development programme that has focused on the effects of heavier axleloads on component performance2. Today’s maximum axleload is one of the highest in the world. The wide-bodied cars used on trains serving the Yandi mining operations have enabled average loadings of 37·5 tonnes to be achieved (Fig 1). This figure was achieved by the introduction of more consistent and even loading procedures. Unlike some other railways which serve a single mine, BHP Billiton draws its ore from several different locations. Differences in the design of loading facilities between mine sites resulted in a greater variability in axleloads. This necessitated tight limits on peak loads, to avoid any risk of the wagon suspensions bottoming when running at speed on the main line.Longer not heavierAlthough a further increase in the axleload is being considered, at present the scope is limited by the increased risk of component deterioration and failure, particularly the aluminothermic rail welds. The current increase in capacity is therefore being implemented through increased use of three-rake (300-car) train formations. As the name suggests, three-rake trains are formed by coupling three 100-car sets together and controlling the intermediate locomotives remotely from the front unit. Three-rake operation began in July 2000, and has steadily increased (Fig 2). Today the line carries four or five such trains each day, out of a total of nine; the others are predominantly two-rake (200-car) trains, with the occasional single-rake train. All ore trains are worked using driver-only operation. Coupled with the use of longer trains has been the introduction of automatic train protection to improve safety. However, the increased use of longer trains has brought additional challenges in the management of in-train (longitudinal) forces. The railway has been working to identify optimum driving strategies for long trains, to avoid delays due to broken trains and damage to couplers and drawgear components.Building on previous research and development programmes, a three-pronged strategy is being applied to the management of track and rolling stock to enable the higher haulage rates required:last_img read more