Lineman involved outside of game

first_imgThe ones who score the touchdowns will get the headlines and most of the publicity, but that’s OK with Wallerstein. In football, a successful lineman must be an ultimate team player, and Wallerstein has learned to put his teammates first. “When they do well, I do well,” Wallerstein said. “When they’re in the newspaper, I know I’m doing my job.” Wallerstein is a part of a top-notch offensive line that includes returning starters Marc Valdez, Nick Madia and Nick Peterson. There isn’t another team in the league with as much strength and blocking skills. “It’s good to have teammates like these guys because if one of us falls, there’s always someone there to pick him up,” Wallerstein said. Wallerstein hopes football can carry him, and with his height and experience there’s a good chance he can develop into a major-college prospect. Beyond dreams of the NFL, Wallerstein hopes to become a forensic scientist. “I like science, and it would fun to investigate stuff,” he said. gerry.gittelson@dailynews.com (661) 257-5218160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! CANYON COUNTRY – A.J. Wallerstein, a 6-foot-4, 255-pound offensive lineman at Canyon High, isn’t your typical football player. He loves to mix it up as much as anyone, helping Canyon to a Southern Section Div. II championship as a sophomore starter last season, but there’s a lot more to Wallerstein – not just as a player but as a person. For one, he’s among Canyon’s top students, maintaining a 4.2 grade-point average while taking difficult advanced-placement courses. Wallerstein also is on the verge of becoming an Eagle Scout in the Boy Scouts, and he’s an active member of his local temple. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREFrumpy Middle-aged Mom: My realistic 2020 New Year’s resolutions. Some involve doughnuts.Perhaps most important, Wallerstein earns a great degree of satisfaction as a full-time summer camp counselor for youngsters ages 6-12. The job has allowed Wallerstein, 15, a chance to give back to the community and to serve as a role model, and he loves being a counselor. “Basically, my main job is to just watch out for the kids and make sure they don’t get hurt, but there’s a lot more to it,” Wallerstein said. “It’s a lot of fun, and I’d like to think the kids believe I’m doing a good job.” Besides his counselor job and daily four-hour football practices, Wallerstein has also managed to fit in an online AP chemistry course through John Hopkins University this summer in hope of lightening his academic load this fall. “He’s got a lot on his plate. He’s extremely well-rounded,” said Wallerstein’s father, David. “A.J. is just really good with kids, too.” Soon, the focus turns to football as Canyon prepares for the season opener in late August. Wallerstein’s main job will be to open holes for star running back J.J. DiLuigi, who scored a Foothill League-record 43touchdowns last year, and to protect quarterback Ben Longshore, who’s primed for a productive season. last_img

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